U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Divider Arrow National Institutes of Health Divider Arrow NCATS

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Showing 41 - 50 of 2250 results

Midostaurin, a derivate of staurosporine (N-benzoylstaurosporine), is a broad-spectrum inhibitor of Ser/Thr and Tyr protein kinases. Midostaurin showed broad antiproliferative activity against various tumor and normal cell lines in vitro and is able to reverse the p-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance of tumor cells in vitro. Midostaurin showed in vivo antitumor activity as single agent and inhibited angiogenesis in vivo. At the end of 2016 FDA granted Priority Review to the PKC412 (midostaurin) new drug application (NDA) for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in newly-diagnosed adults with an FMS-like tyrosine kinase-3 (FLT3) mutation, as well as for the treatment of advanced systemic mastocytosis (SM).
Latanoprost (free acid) is a metabolite of latanoprost which has been approved for use as an ocular hypotensive drug. Latanoprost is an isopropyl ester prodrug which is converted to the Latanoprost-acid by endogenous esterase enzymes. The free acid is pharmacologically active and is 200 times more potent than latanoprost as an agonist of the human recombinant Prostaglandin F receptor. However, the free Latanoprost-acid is more irritating and less effective than Latanoprost when applied directly to the eyes of human glaucoma patients.
Copanlisib, developed by Bayer, is a phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor with potential antineoplastic activity. Copanlisib inhibits the activation of the PI3K signaling pathway, which may result in inhibition of tumor cell growth and survival in susceptible tumor cell populations. Activation of the PI3K signaling pathway is frequently associated with tumorigenesis and dysregulated PI3K signaling may contribute to tumor resistance to a variety of antineoplastic agents. Copanlisib is currently under Phase II/III clinical trials for the treatment of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia.
Status:

Class (Stereo):
CHEMICAL (ACHIRAL)


Conditions:

Benznidazole is an antiparasitic medication used in first-line treatment of Chagas disease. Benznidazole is a nitroimidazole antiparasitic with good activity against acute infection with Trypanosoma cruzi, commonly referred to as Chagas disease. Like other nitroimidazoles, benznidazole's main mechanism of action is to generate radical species which can damage the parasite's DNA or cellular machinery. Under anaerobic conditions, the nitro group of nitroimidazoles is believed to be reduced by the pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase complex to create a reactive nitro radical species. The nitro radical can then either engage in other redox reactions directly or spontaneously give rise to a nitrite ion and imidazole radical instead. In mammals, the principal mediators of electron transport are NAD+/NADH and NADP+/NADPH, which have a more positive reduction potential and so will not reduce nitroimidazoles to the radical form. This limits the spectrum of activity of nitroimidazoles so that host cells and DNA are not also damaged. This mechanism has been well-established for 5-nitroimidazoles such as metronidazole, but it is unclear if the same mechanism can be expanded to 2-nitroimidazoles (including benznidazole). In the presence of oxygen, by contrast, any radical nitro compounds produced will be rapidly oxidized by molecular oxygen, yielding the original nitroimidazole compound and a superoxide anion in a process known as "futile cycling". In these cases, the generation of superoxide is believed to give rise to other reactive oxygen species. The degree of toxicity or mutagenicity produced by these oxygen radicals depends on cells' ability to detoxify superoxide radicals and other reactive oxygen species. In mammals, these radicals can be converted safely to hydrogen peroxide, meaning benznidazole has very limited direct toxicity to human cells. In Trypanosoma species, however, there is a reduced capacity to detoxify these radicals, which results in damage to the parasite's cellular machinery. Benznidazole has a significant activity during the acute phase of Chagas disease, with a therapeutical success rate up to 80%. Its curative capabilities during the chronic phase are, however, limited. Some studies have found parasitologic cure (a complete elimination of T. cruzi from the body) in pediatric and young patients during the early stage of the chronic phase, but overall failure rate in chronically infected individuals is typically above 80%. However, some studies indicate treatment with benznidazole during the chronic phase, even if incapable of producing parasitologic cure, because it reduces electrocardiographic changes and a delays worsening of the clinical condition of the patient. Side effects tend to be common and occur more frequently with increased age. The most common adverse reactions associated with benznidazole are allergic dermatitis and peripheral neuropathy. It is reported that up to 30% of people will experience dermatitis when starting treatment. Benznidazole may cause photosensitization of the skin, resulting in rashes. Rashes usually appear within the first 2 weeks of treatment and resolve over time. In rare instances, skin hypersensitivity can result in exfoliative skin eruptions, edema, and fever. Peripheral neuropathy may occur later on in the treatment course and is dose-dependent. Other adverse reactions include anorexia, weight loss, nausea, vomiting, insomnia, and dyslexia, and bone marrow suppression. Gastrointestinal symptoms usually occur during the initial stages of treatment and resolves over time. Bone marrow suppression has been linked to the cumulative dose exposure.
Status:

Class (Stereo):
CHEMICAL (ABSOLUTE)



Macimorelin (AEZS 130) is an orally active, small-molecule, peptidomimetic growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR1A) agonist (ghrelin analogue), being developed by AEterna Zentaris for the diagnosis of adult growth hormone deficiency (AGHD; somatotropin deficiency), and for the treatment of cachexia associated with chronic disease such as AIDS and cancer. Macimorelin was approved by the FDA in December 2017 under the market name Macrilen for oral solution. Macimorelin stimulates GH release by activating growth hormone secretagogue receptors present in the pituitary and hypothalamus. Macimorelin has been granted orphan drug designation by the FDA for diagnosis of AGHD.
Status:

Class (Stereo):
CHEMICAL (ABSOLUTE)



Naldemedine (Symproic) is an opioid antagonist indicated for the treatment of opioid-induced constipation (OIC) in adult patients with chronic non-cancer pain. Naldemedine is an opioid antagonist with binding affinities for mu-, delta-, and kappa-opioid receptors. Naldemedine functions as a peripherally-acting mu-opioid receptor antagonist in tissues such as the gastrointestinal tract, thereby decreasing the constipating effects of opioids. Naldemedine is a derivative of naltrexone to which a side chain has been added that increases the molecular weight and the polar surface area, thereby reducing its ability to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Naldemedine is also a substrate of the P-glycoprotein (P-gp) efflux transporter. Based on these properties, the CNS penetration of naldemedine is expected to be negligible at the recommended dose levels, limiting the potential for interference with centrally-mediated opioid analgesia. Naldemedine was approved in 2017 in both the US and Japan for the treatment of Opioid-induced Constipation.
Status:

Class (Stereo):
CHEMICAL (ABSOLUTE)



Pibrentasvir is a direct acting antiviral agent and Hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS5A inhibitor that targets the the viral RNA replication and viron assembly. NS5A is a phosphoprotein that plays an essential role in replication, assembly and maturation of infectious viral proteins. The basal phosphorylated form of NS5A, which is maintained by C-terminal serine cluster, is key in ensuring its interaction with the viral capsid protein, or the core protein. By blocking this interaction, pibrentasvir inhibits the assembly of proteins and production of mature HCV particles. In the United States and Europe, Pibrentasvir is approved for use with glecaprevir as the combination drug glecaprevir/pibrentasvir (trade name Mavyret in the US and Maviret in the EU) for the treatment of hepatitis C. This fixed-dose combination therapy was FDA-approved in August 2017 to treat adults with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes 1-6 without cirrhosis (liver disease) or with mild cirrhosis, including patients with moderate to severe kidney disease and those who are on dialysis.
Status:

Class (Stereo):
CHEMICAL (ABSOLUTE)



Telotristat (telotristat etiprate) is an ethyl ester prodrug which is hydrolyzed to its active moiety LP-778902 both in vivo and in vitro. Telotristat etiprate is an orally bioavailable, small-molecule, tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) inhibitor. It is the first investigational drug in clinical studies to target TPH, an enzyme that triggers the excess serotonin production within metastatic neuroendocrine tumor (mNET) cells leading to carcinoid syndrome. Unlike existing treatments of carcinoid syndrome which reduce the release of serotonin outside tumor cells, telotristat etiprate reduces serotonin production within the tumor cells. By specifically inhibiting serotonin production telotristat may provide patients with more control over their disease. Telotristat etiprate has received Fast Track and Orphan Drug designation from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and has been granted priority review by the FDA with a Prescription Drug User Fee Act (PDUFA) target action date of February 28, 2017.
Delafloxacin (CAS registry number 189279-58-1) was described as WQ-3034 by Wakunaga Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., Osaka & Hiroshima, Japan. It was first licensed in 1999 to Abbott Park, IL, and further developed as ABT-492. Delafloxacin (Baxdela), a fluoroquinolone antibiotic, is currently being developed by Melinta Therapeutics. It is a novel investigational fluoroquinolone in development for the treatment of uncomplicated gonorrhea, and acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections. Delafloxacin shows MICs remarkably low against Gram-positive organisms and anaerobes and similar to those of ciprofloxacin against Gram-negative bacteria. It remains active against most fluoroquinolone-resistant strains, except enterococci. Its potency is further increased in acidic environments (found in many infection sites). Delafloxacin is active on staphylococci growing intracellularly or in biofilms. Delafloxacin is a dual-targeting fluoroquinolone, capable of forming cleavable complexes with DNA and topoisomerase IV or DNA gyrase and of inhibiting the activity of these enzymes in both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. On Oct 24, 2016, Melinta Therapeutics Submitted Baxdela New Drug Application for hospital-treated skin infections.
Status:
First approved in 2017
Source:
NDA207145
Source URL:

Class (Stereo):
CHEMICAL (ABSOLUTE)



Safinamide (FCE 26743, NW 1015, PNU 151774, PNU 151774E, trade name Xadago) combines potent, selective, and reversible inhibition of MAO-B with blockade of voltage-dependent Na+ and Ca2+ channels and inhibition of glutamate release. Safinamide is under development with Newron, Zambon and Meiji Seika Pharma for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. Safinamide has been launched in the EU, Iceland and Liechtenstein. Safinamide was well tolerated and safe in the clinical development program that demonstrated the amelioration of motor symptoms and OFF phenomena by safinamide when combined with dopamine agonists or levodopa.