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Showing 102011 - 102020 of 107353 results

Status:
US Previously Marketed
Source:
21 CFR 310.545(a)(12)(iv)(A) laxative:stimulant laxative calcium pantothenate
Source URL:
First approved in 1988
Source:
Dialyvite by Atlantic Biologicals Corps.
Source URL:

Class (Stereo):
CHEMICAL (ABSOLUTE)

Cefotiam is a third generation beta-lactam cephalosporin antibiotic. It has broad spectrum activity against Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. It does not have activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The bactericidal activity of cefotiam results from the inhibition of cell wall synthesis via affinity for penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs).
Cefotiam is a third generation beta-lactam cephalosporin antibiotic. It has broad spectrum activity against Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. It does not have activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The bactericidal activity of cefotiam results from the inhibition of cell wall synthesis via affinity for penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs).
Cefotiam is a third generation beta-lactam cephalosporin antibiotic. It has broad spectrum activity against Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. It does not have activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The bactericidal activity of cefotiam results from the inhibition of cell wall synthesis via affinity for penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs).
Status:
US Previously Marketed
First approved in 1987

Class (Stereo):
CHEMICAL (ABSOLUTE)



Cefmenoxime is a semisynthetic beta-lactam cephalosporin antibiotic with activity similar to that of cefotaxime. Like other 'third-generation' cephalosporins it is active in vitro against most common Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens, is a potent inhibitor of Enterobacteriaceae (including beta-lactamase-producing strains), and is resistant to hydrolysis by beta-lactamases. Cefmenoxime has a high rate of clinical efficacy in many types of infection and is at least equal in clinical and bacteriological efficacy to several other cephalosporins in urinary tract infections, respiratory tract infections, postoperative infections and gonorrhoea. The bactericidal activity of cefmenoxime results from the inhibition of cell wall synthesis via affinity for penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs). Cefmenoxime is stable in the presence of a variety of b-lactamases, including penicillinases and some cephalosporinases. Cefmenoxime is marketed in Japan under the brand name Bestron, indicated for the treatment of otitis externa, otitis media, and sinusitis. Cefmenoxime hydrochloride was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on Dec 30, 1987. It was developed and marketed as Cefmax®, but it has being discontinued.
Status:
US Previously Marketed
First approved in 1987

Class (Stereo):
CHEMICAL (ACHIRAL)


Phenazopyridine hydrochloride, an azo dye marketed in the US in 1914, became widely prescribed for the treatment of urinary tract infections (UTIs). With the assumption that the drug possessed antiseptic properties, phenazopyridine was recommended for UTIs caused by Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, and Escherichia coli. Although in the early 1930s the medical and scientific communities rescinded the claim that phenazopyridine is bactericidal, a specific mechanism of action has not been identified subsequently. Currently, phenazopyridine is classified as a urinary analgesic that relieves burning, urgency, frequency, and pain associated with UTI, trauma, or surgery.
Penbutolol is a new beta-adrenergic blocking drug approved for the treatment of hypertension. It is a noncardioselective beta-blocker and has intrinsic sympathomimetic activity. Penbutolol is marketed under the trade names Levatol, Levatolol, Lobeta, Paginol, Hostabloc, Betapressin. Penbutolol acts on the β1 adrenergic receptors in both the heart and the kidney. When β1 receptors are activated by catecholamines, they stimulate a coupled G protein that leads to the conversion of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). The increase in cAMP leads to activation of protein kinase A (PKA), which alters the movement of calcium ions in heart muscle and increases the heart rate. Penbutolol blocks the catecholamine activation of β1 adrenergic receptors and decreases heart rate, which lowers blood pressure. Levatol (Penbutolol) is indicated in the treatment of mild to moderate arterial hypertension. It may be used alone or in combination with other antihypertensive agents, especially thiazide-type diuretics.
Status:
US Previously Marketed
First approved in 1987

Class (Stereo):
CHEMICAL (ABSOLUTE)



Cefmenoxime is a semisynthetic beta-lactam cephalosporin antibiotic with activity similar to that of cefotaxime. Like other 'third-generation' cephalosporins it is active in vitro against most common Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens, is a potent inhibitor of Enterobacteriaceae (including beta-lactamase-producing strains), and is resistant to hydrolysis by beta-lactamases. Cefmenoxime has a high rate of clinical efficacy in many types of infection and is at least equal in clinical and bacteriological efficacy to several other cephalosporins in urinary tract infections, respiratory tract infections, postoperative infections and gonorrhoea. The bactericidal activity of cefmenoxime results from the inhibition of cell wall synthesis via affinity for penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs). Cefmenoxime is stable in the presence of a variety of b-lactamases, including penicillinases and some cephalosporinases. Cefmenoxime is marketed in Japan under the brand name Bestron, indicated for the treatment of otitis externa, otitis media, and sinusitis. Cefmenoxime hydrochloride was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on Dec 30, 1987. It was developed and marketed as Cefmax®, but it has being discontinued.
Status:
US Previously Marketed
First approved in 1986
Source:
NOROXIN by Kyorin Pharmaceutical
Source URL:

Class (Stereo):
CHEMICAL (ACHIRAL)



Norfloxacin is an antibacterial agent, It inhibits inhibits DNA synthesis by inhibiting DNA gyrase enzyme. Norfloxacin was approved in 1986 for treatment of urinary tract infections, gynecological infections, prostatitis, gonorhhea and bladder infections. In ophtalmology, norfloxacin is used for treatment of conjunctivitus.

Showing 102011 - 102020 of 107353 results