U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Divider Arrow National Institutes of Health Divider Arrow NCATS

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}

    {{facet.count}}
    {{facet.count}}
Allopregnanolone is a neurosteroid metabolite of progesterone. It is an allosteric modulator of inhibitory γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA-A) receptors on neural stem cells and other cell types in the brain. Allopregnanolone has effects similar to those of other positive allosteric modulators of the GABA action at GABAA receptor such as the benzodiazepines, including anxiolytic, sedative, and anticonvulsant activity. A solution of allopregnanolone, SAGE-547 is an intravenous allosteric modulator of both synaptic and extrasynaptic γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA)receptors. It's believed that allopregnanolone is effective as an anticonvulsant when prolonged seizure activity has become resistant to benzodiazepine treatment. Under the names brexanolone and SAGE-547, allopregnanolone is under development by SAGE Therapeutics as an intravenously administered drug for the treatment of super-refractory status epilepticus, postpartum depression, and essential tremor. Allopregnanolone is in phase III trials for the treatment of super-refractory status epilepticus (SRSE) and postpartum depression.
Erdafitinib (JNJ-42756493) is a potent and selective orally bioavailable, pan fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) inhibitor with potential antineoplastic activity. It was discovered in collaboration with Janssen Pharmaceutica, N.V. from a partnership which commenced in June 2008. Astex’s FGFr inhibitor program originated from a collaboration initiated in 2005 with the Cancer Research UK Drug Discovery Group at the Newcastle Cancer Centre (Newcastle University UK), and Cancer Research Technology Limited. JNJ42756493 is currently being evaluated by Janssen in Phase 2 clinical trials in patients with urothelial cancer, advanced hepatocellular carcinoma, advanced non-small lung cancer, esophageal cancer or cholangiocarcinoma. JNJ-42756493 is a potent, oral pan-FGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor with half-maximal inhibitory concentration values in the low nanomolar range for all members of the FGFR family (FGFR1 to FGFR4), with minimal activity on vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) kinases compared with FGFR kinases (approximately 20-fold potency difference). In vitro, the proliferation of cells treated with JNJ-42756493 is decreased, associated with increased apoptotic death and decreased cell survival. It is also in phase I trials for the treatment of advanced refractory solid tumors or advanced refractory hematologic cancer.
Alpelisib (BYL719) is a PI3Kα-selective inhibitor. PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathway is frequently activated in cancer, therefore investigational PI3K inhibitor alpelisib is considered to be effective as an anticancer agent and has been in clinical development by Novartis. Alpelisib have demonstrated activity in preclinical models of solid tumors and had favorable tolerability profiles, with the most common adverse events consistent with “on-target” inhibition of PI3K in early clinical studies. There are ongoing clinical trials of alpelisib in a range of cancer types, including breast cancer, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, non-small cell lung carcinoma, lymphoma, and glioblastoma multiforme. Combination therapy with other chemo therapeutics may be preferable.

Class (Stereo):
CHEMICAL (ACHIRAL)



Tafamidis meglumine (Vyndaqel®, Pfizer) is a novel, first-in-class drug for the treatment of transthyretin familial amyloid polyneuropathy (TTR-FAP), a rare neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive sensory, motor and autonomic impairment that is ultimately fatal. Pathogenic mutations in the transthyretin (TTR) protein lead to destabilization of its tetrameric structure and subsequent formation of amyloid aggregates. Tafamidis is a small-molecule inhibitor that binds selectively to TTR in human plasma and kinetically stabilizes the tetrameric structure of both wild-type TTR and a number of different mutants. Clinical trials indicate that tafamidis slows disease progression in patients with TTR-FAP and reduces the burden of disease, demonstrating improvement in small and large nerve fiber function, modified body mass index and lower extremity neurological examination. Tafamidis meglumine has been launched for TTR FAP in the EU, Japan, Argentina, Malta and Mexico, and is preregistration in the US for this indication.
Triclabendazole, (brand name Avomec, Egaten, etc) is a member of the benzimidazole family of anthelmintics used to treat liver flukes, specifically fascioliasis and paragonimiasis. Triclabendazole used routinely since 1983 in veterinary practice for the treatment of fascioliasis. It was not used in humans until the 1989 epidemic of fascioliasis near the Caspian Sea when Iranian authorities approved the use of the veterinary formulation to treat the infection. Fasciolicidal not only against the adult worms present in the biliary ducts, but also against the immature larval stages of Fasciola migrating through the hepatic parenchyma. Triclabendazole is shown to penetrate into liver flukes by transtegumentary absorption followed by inhibition of the parasite's motility, probably related to the destruction of the microtubular structure, resulting in the death of the parasite; the immobilizing effect is paralleled by changes in the parasite's resting tegumental membrane potential, strongly inhibiting the release of proteolytic enzymes, a process that appears critical to the survival of the parasite. Side effects are generally few, but can include abdominal pain and headaches. Biliary colic may occur due to dying worms. While no harms have been found with use during pregnancy, triclabendazole has not been well studied in this population. Triclabendazole is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines, the most effective and safe medicines needed in a health system. It is not commercially available in the United States.
Cannabidiol is the major nonpsychoactive ingredient in cannabis. Cannabidiol demonstrates a range of effects that may be therapeutically useful, including anti-seizure, antioxidant, neuroprotective, anti-inflammatory, analgesic, anti-tumor, anti-psychotic, and anti-anxiety properties. Exact mechanism of action of cannabidiol is not known, but may include effects on the orphan G-protein-coupled receptor GPR55; the transient receptor potential of vanilloid type-1 channel; the 5-HT1a receptor; and the α3 glycine receptors. GW Pharmaceuticals successfully developed the world’s first prescription medicine derived from the cannabis plant, Sativex® (buccal spray containing delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol) now approved in over 29 countries outside of the United States for the treatment of spasticity due to Multiple Sclerosis. GW Pharmaceuticals is developing Epidiolex® (a liquid formulation of pure plant-derived cannabidiol) for certain rare and severe early-onset, drug-resistant epilepsy syndromes.
Elcometrine (Segesterone acetate, Nestorone) is a steroidal progestin which is used as a hormonal contraceptive and as a treatment of endometriosis. Upon oral administration, Nestorone undergoes rapid metabolism and inactivation. Several clinical trials have been performed with Nestorone administered via subdermal implants.

Class (Stereo):
CHEMICAL (ABSOLUTE)


Conditions:

Migalastat (Galafold)-a small molecule drug developed by Amicus Therapeutics that restores the activity of specific mutant forms of α-galactosidase-has been approved for the treatment of Fabry disease in the EU in patients with amenable mutations. Migalastat attaches to certain unstable forms of alpha-galactosidase A, stabilising the enzyme. This allows the enzyme to be transported into areas of the cell where it can break down GL-3. Under the trade name Galafold (formerly known as Amigal), Migalastat is used to treat patients aged 16 years or over with Fabry disease. Because the number of patients with Fabry disease is low, the disease is considered ‘rare’, and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) assigned Galafold orphan drug status in 2004, and the European Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) followed in 2006.